Mismanaged VA project stumbles along, officials remain silent

The Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) healthcare facility and cemetery project at Alameda Point still has not broken ground, a decade after the first round of Congressional funding.  Public officials appear to look away.

The latest setback comes with the VA having to re-do the contract for constructing the wetland mitigation plan.  For unknown reasons, in November 2020, less than four months after the VA hired a company to perform the wetland work for $2.37 million, that company is out of the picture.  The VA is now trying to find other companies with the same engineering skillset.  The actual competitive bidding process will follow.  The VA estimates the wetland project could now cost between $5 million and $10 million.  Continue reading “Mismanaged VA project stumbles along, officials remain silent”

City to seek funding for wetland park at Alameda Point

The proposed ecological wetland park at Alameda Point, known as DePave Park, is another step closer to becoming a reality.  On Sept. 15, 2020, four members of the city council gave thumbs up to moving forward with seeking a $2 million grant to pay for a master planning process.

“I am super-stoked about this project; it’s better than I ever imagined,” said Councilmember Jim Oddie, who has led recent efforts at City Hall to get action on this park.  “I was really touched when I saw the drawing.  I broke down in tears it was so beautiful.”

As currently envisioned, park construction will entail removing old pavement and softening the edge of the western side of the Seaplane Lagoon which will allow water into the park and become adaptable to sea level rise.  A tidal channel through the park will connect the Seaplane Lagoon with the existing wetland on the federal property, thereby creating a combined wetland ecosystem with multiplied benefits. Continue reading “City to seek funding for wetland park at Alameda Point”

City misses chance to embrace wetlands at Alameda Point

The city and its consultant recently released a report outlining what will be included in the new climate action plan for Alameda.  What it reveals, unfortunately, is their resistance to thinking big.

The process for updating Alameda’s climate action plan began as a promising effort for a comprehensive look at what it means to adapt our entire environment to climate change.  It is winding up with a narrow focus on protecting local real estate, which they refer to as “vulnerable assets.”

The city has rejected a broader scope of action that would include “opportunity assets,” as in opportunities to improve the natural environment, not just the built environment.  Areas at Alameda Point not slated for development must be viewed as an opportunity asset that can be re-purposed for the good of the environment. Continue reading “City misses chance to embrace wetlands at Alameda Point”

Regional park district and city negotiate land deal for park

On July 28, representatives of the city and the East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD), along with members of the public, toured the future site of a regional park on the former Navy runway area at Alameda Point.  The 158-acre area runs along the Oakland Estuary out to the western shoreline with its sweeping views of San Francisco Bay out to the Golden Gate Bridge.

View from the proposed regional park on May 11, 2017, during Restoration Advisory Board tour.

Bob Nisbet, assistant general manager of EBRPD, and Jennifer Ott, base reuse manager for the city, explained that the city and park district are working on a joint agreement called a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that will allow EBRPD to build and operate the park.  The land is being transferred from the Navy to the city in phases as environmental remediation is completed.  Following the final land transfer in about four years, the city would then lease the land to EBRPD for 66 years, the maximum allowable under state law for tidelands along state waterways. Continue reading “Regional park district and city negotiate land deal for park”

Navy adds a wetland and grassland

The Navy’s cleanup program has not only removed toxic substances from below ground, it has dramatically improved some of the above ground environment by creating new native grassland and wetlands. January rains filled the Navy’s new seasonal wetland on the northwest shoreline corner of Alameda Point and fostered growth of newly planted native grass seed on the surrounding soil.

New Site 1 wetland on January 13, 2016, with San Francisco in background. Rows in soil with emerging growth were created during sowing of seeds. Navy photo.
New Site 1 wetland on January 13, 2016, with San Francisco in background. Rows in soil with emerging growth were created during sowing of seeds. Navy photo.

The 2.25-acre wetland lies within an approximately 37-acre shoreline cleanup area known as Site 1 at the confluence of the Oakland Estuary and San Francisco Bay. It is where the Navy buried its waste between 1943 and 1956. Most of the waste pits were covered by pavement in the mid-1950s when a new runway was added. Continue reading “Navy adds a wetland and grassland”

Wetland park plan at Seaplane Lagoon gets a boost

It’s more likely a new wetland will be created on the western shoreline of the Seaplane Lagoon at Alameda Point, thanks to lobbying efforts led by the Sierra Club.

Sierra Club in Alameda's 4th of July Parade 2014
Sierra Club in Alameda’s 4th of July Parade 2014

On July 1, 2014, the Alameda City Council added language to the Alameda Point Town Center and Waterfront Specific Plan that raises the commitment to remove pavement from the western side of the Seaplane Lagoon for wetland—an area called De-Pave Park.  Lobbying efforts convinced the council to include the following options to help facilitate the wetland park creation:  1) creating a wetland mitigation bank; 2) adding the area to a possible national wildlife refuge on the federal property; and 3) working with local community members who may identify funding sources for creating the passive park area. Continue reading “Wetland park plan at Seaplane Lagoon gets a boost”

Landfill landscaping on Nature Reserve – Update October 2013

Landscaping of the 100-acre landfill area on the southwest corner of Alameda Point is nearing completion.  The seeding of the landfill site with flowering native grasses is almost ready to begin.  Contouring of the site is complete.  Stabilization of the shoulder around the wetland area is complete.  Placement of the final soil cover is underway.

Site 2 wetland area and adjacent contouring underway in early July 2013.  Wetland area has since been expanded by several acres.  Port of Oakland is in the background.  Bay Trail will eventually follow the foreground shoreline along the Bay.  Funding and construction of the Bay Trail is not part of this project, and is yet to be funded.
Site 2 wetland area and adjacent contouring underway in early July 2013. Wetland area has since been expanded by several acres. Port of Oakland is in the background. Bay Trail will eventually follow the foreground shoreline along the Bay. Funding and construction of the Bay Trail is not part of this project, and is yet to be funded.

The contouring of this industrial landfill site was completed on August 16, 2013.  Approximately one-third of the contouring, or base layer, soil is clean soil recycled from Seaplane Lagoon dredging.  The recycled soil stock was quickly exhausted, along with soil recycled after removing some of the berms and high areas.  More than half of the base layer – 193,000 cubic yards – is soil barged in from Decker Island in the Sacramento River. 

Soil being delivered from Decker Island.
Soil being delivered from Decker Island.

This contouring phase, which began in January of 2013, created the base layer with a specially-engineered slope.  It was then scanned for radiation using scanners towed by a small vehicle, even though the site had been surveyed for radiation prior to placing the base layer.

Scanning the base layer for radiation.
Scanning the base layer for radiation.

Placement of the plastic biobarrier (see photo below) and the final soil cover using soil barged in from Decker Island began on August 19, 2013.  The biobarrier is a plastic mesh that is designed to discourage burrowing animals from coming into contact with the waste area.  The biobarrier installation is over 90% complete as of week #38 (October 24, 2013).  The final two-foot soil cover is over 60% complete.  The final soil cover includes six inches of soil amended to promote growth of vegetation. 

The soil stabilization and drainage work on the shoulder around the wetland area is also completed.  It includes native rye grass seeding, a jute mesh cover, and a silt fence.  Some of the rye grass has already started to sprout.

Stormwater controls near wetland area being created.
Stormwater controls near wetland area being created.

New monitoring wells will be installed starting in late November. 

Hydroseeding of the site with an assortment of California native grasses will begin in late November or early December. 

In 2014 the old culvert connecting the north side of the wetland with San Francisco Bay will be replaced with a new culvert.

Fifty tons of old fence and metal have been recycled.  The temporary work fence will be removed at the end of the job.  The methane gas vents will be short and virtually unnoticeable (see photo below).  Due to the age of the landfill and the fact that very little organic waste was deposited there, the methane gas produced is minor and will not require the 10-foot tall vent stacks proposed in an earlier workplan.

Methane gas vent pipes.
Methane gas vent pipes.

This site, along with adjacent land, will be transferred to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs in late 2013 or early 2014.

VA map, with Site 2 and Nature Reserve notations added by Alameda Point Environmental Report.
VA map, with Site 2 and Nature Reserve notations added by Alameda Point Environmental Report.

Biobarrier to discourage burrowing animals.  Photo credit:  Alameda Point Environmental Report.
Biobarrier to discourage burrowing animals. Photo credit: Alameda Point Environmental Report.

Interim stormwater controls - tracked slope.

Silt fence installed above jute mesh around wetland area.
Silt fence installed above jute mesh around wetland area.

Silt fence under construction.
Silt fence under construction.

Jute mesh around wetland should, with grass starting to sprout.
Jute mesh around wetland shoulder, with grass starting to sprout.

Week 36 - Vegetation growing through jute mesh around shoulder of wetland area.
Week 36 – Vegetation growing through jute mesh around shoulder of wetland area.

Source:   The information in this update was gathered from the weekly progress reports for Installation Restoration Site 2 Remedial Action at Alameda Point.  The progress reports are posted on the Envirostor website maintained by the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC).  The source for all photos in this update, unless otherwise credited, is DTSC.