Breakwater Beach landscape upgrades coming in 2017

The beach at the eastern end of Alameda Point near the dormant campground will undergo a major renovation in 2017. The East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD) is planning to create a natural dune landscape. They are also planning to bring in more sand to the beach in order to raise the elevation to allow use of the beach at high tide.

Breakwater Beach at Alameda Point

Continue reading “Breakwater Beach landscape upgrades coming in 2017”

Transportation agency calls for more housing in Alameda

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) issued a new regional planning document on August 30, 2016, suggesting the amount of housing needed in Alameda to meet state goals. MTC is requesting input from local jurisdictions.

Alameda City Planner Andrew Thomas slammed the commission’s recommendations as being woefully out of touch with Alameda’s existing land uses and its limited regional transit connections.

Approved plan for Priority Development Area (PDA) at Alameda Point.
Approved plan for Priority Development Area (PDA) at Alameda Point.

MTC’s forecast calls for adding roughly 10,000 new homes in Alameda by 2040, with the majority to be added in existing neighborhoods, outside of so-called Priority Development Areas (PDAs) like Alameda Point and the Northern Waterfront. This could only be accomplished if a host of improbable and unrealistic events were to occur, according to Thomas. Continue reading “Transportation agency calls for more housing in Alameda”

Veterans clinic, columbarium stalled in Congress

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has still not received its 2016 budget allocation of $70 million to build new facilities at Alameda Point, nine months after the federal budget was signed into law on December 18, 2015. Efforts in the House and Senate to authorize getting the VA’s money released were hindered in July when Senate Republicans attached a bill to fund stopping the spread of the mosquito-borne Zika virus to the VA construction bill.

The Zika bill included restrictions that do not allow the use of Zika funds at Planned Parenthood clinics and a waiver on following Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines for pesticide spraying to kill mosquitoes. Senate Democrats prevented passage of the Zika/VA bill by voting against it, due to the Planned Parenthood and EPA clauses. Both parties are pointing fingers.

Alameda Point Veterans Affairs facility. Oakland Estuary in background. Columbarium will be to the left.
Alameda Point Veterans Affairs facility. Oakland Estuary in background. Columbarium will be to the left.

Continue reading “Veterans clinic, columbarium stalled in Congress”

Ospreys nest successfully in 2016 at Alameda Point

Location, location, location! But for a fenced-off dilapidated navigation light stand on a jetty at the Seaplane Lagoon, ospreys would not have had a successful nesting season this year.

In late August two adult ospreys took flight from their Seaplane Lagoon perch for parts unknown with two healthy offspring. It was a welcome sight because for the past three years a series of frustrating avian soap operas featuring other ospreys and unwanted nesting attempts aboard the maritime ship Admiral Callaghan were marked with failure. Previously in 2012 they had raised one chick, the only other recorded case of osprey reproduction at Alameda Point.

Two young ospreys on June 8, 2016, at Alameda Point Seaplane Lagoon.
Two young ospreys on June 8, 2016, at Alameda Point Seaplane Lagoon.

Continue reading “Ospreys nest successfully in 2016 at Alameda Point”

Parking shortage dogs Main St. Ferry Terminal

Ferry riders driving to the Main Street Ferry Terminal began using an extra parking lot in May. The city-owned O Club parking lot across the street from the terminal provides 121 spaces under a temporary license agreement with the Water Emergency Transportation Authority (WETA). Despite the added parking lot, the street shoulder and unpaved lot west of a dog park continue to absorb overflow.

O Club parking lot on Main Street for ferry riders. Licensed for use by WETA.
O Club parking lot on Main Street for ferry riders. Licensed for use by WETA.

“Ridership has grown 29 percent since May, the month we opened the lot,” said Kevin Connolly, WETA’s manager of planning and development. “Given that the street and dirt lot were basically full at that time, it makes sense that the O Club has absorbed the additional riders.”

Unpaved city-owned parking lot on Main Street west of dog park used by ferry riders.
Unpaved city-owned parking lot on Main Street west of dog park used by ferry riders.

A ferry access study conducted by WETA in 2014 led to the O Club interim parking solution. The option of converting the nearby dog park to ferry parking was put on hold until the dog park could be moved a mile away to the planned Estuary Park.

Dog owners interviewed this past weekend at the Main Street dog park don’t see why the area they use for exercising their dogs should be blocking expansion of ferry parking. “I believe that it would be a better use of taxpayer money by relocating this dog park and turning it into a parking structure,” said Jennifer Keene, who lives near the Bay Farm Bridge. Keene drives across the island because it’s less crowded than Alameda’s other dog park.

Dog park on Main Street next to ferry terminal parking lot. Looking west with San Francisco in background.
Dog park on Main Street next to ferry terminal parking lot. Looking west with San Francisco in background.

“I really like the idea of moving this dog park to Estuary Park because it has a lot more trees, and it’s a better area for the dogs,” said Madison Walzberg, a resident of Coast Guard Housing. “It doesn’t take much to make a dog park. If they just fence it in, it would be a great solution for anyone with dogs,” said Walzberg.

Estuary Park Phase 2 area

Construction work on the first phase of Estuary Park on Mosley Avenue, featuring sports fields, began in August. Phase 2 of park construction, featuring an open meadow, picnic area and dog park, has yet to be funded. This four-acre section near the Alameda Landing residential area, which is already fenced in on three sides, could serve as an interim dog park by adding fencing to the remaining 500 feet along the street, according to Walzberg.

The demand for added ferry service at the Main Street Terminal prompted WETA to add five additional weekday departures last year. The enhanced service was set to expire this fall, but WETA will be extending the enhanced service through the end of 2017, thanks to a grant from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission.

WETA ferries operating on Oakland Estuary during weekday morning commute time.
WETA ferries operating on Oakland Estuary during weekday morning commute time.

In her report to the WETA Board of Directors in August, Executive Director Nina Rannells said, “The service enhancement would coincide with the delivery of two new vessels for central bay service, the Cetus and the Hydrus in early 2017.” Both vessels will have capacity for 399 passengers and up to 50 bicycles. “The new vessels represent a significant improvement over today’s operations, where average capacity in the AM period is 324 seats and bikes are sometimes limited to 30 spaces,” said Rannells.

Combined monthly ridership for the Oakland and Alameda Main Street terminals increased by 18,234 passengers from July 2015 to July 2016, representing an increase of 15.69 percent. The systemwide increase for the same period was 7.78 percent.

“All the parking spots get full very early, and you have to fight for a spot,” said Keene. “They park all the way down the road past the nursery, and that’s kind of a hazard, especially early in the morning or late in the evening trying to cross the street.” Keene said that she would gladly pay to “park in a legit parking structure.”

Ferry riders' vehicles parked on shoulder of Main Street at Singleton Avenue.
Ferry riders’ vehicles parked on shoulder of Main Street at Singleton Avenue.

Dog owner Jeff Anderer, a resident of Marina Village, says he uses both dog parks but does not use the ferry. “I come to this dog park on the warmer days for the sea breeze,” said Anderer. “Strictly speaking as a dog owner and not as a ferry user, I do think the parking is more important.”

Ferry riders walking to terminal alongside dog park.
Ferry riders walking to terminal alongside dog park.

Asked about costs for expanded parking, Connolly said, “That’s something we will be studying in the coming year or two as part of a comprehensive look at Main Street and its capital needs.”

The city council will be discussing the goals and objectives of a $400,000 citywide transit and transportation plan on September 6.

Originally published in the Alameda Sun.

More photos and video

O Club parking lot

Main St. Ferry Terminal parking lot

Main Street dog park.
Main Street dog park.
City-owned unpaved overflow ferry parking lot, with dog park and terminal in background.
City-owned unpaved overflow ferry parking lot, with dog park and terminal in background.

https://vimeo.com/181268327

Harbor seals adapting to new float

A new concrete float for harbor seals was delivered to Alameda Point on June 22. It is the first-of-its-kind on the West Coast. With seals starting to use the new platform, a milestone has been reached culminating two-and-a-half years of citizen advocacy to maintain a resting site for harbor seals at Alameda Point. A ferry maintenance facility is slated to begin construction this summer where the seals have been finding solitude for over a decade. The new float will be anchored 300 yards away to the east.

Harbor seals on new float Alameda

In an effort to acclimate the seals to their new float and surroundings, the float is being moved in stages to its permanent location. It will be anchored a hundred yards offshore from the Bay Trail near the soccer field on West Hornet Avenue. Continue reading “Harbor seals adapting to new float”

Marine ecosystem thrives at Alameda Point

Conservation of wildlife isn’t just important at Crab Cove 

Visitors flock to Crab Cove, a State Marine Conservation Area, to learn about and experience the Bay’s sea dwellers. The educational lessons at the Crab Cove Visitor Center are equally relevant throughout the waterway south of the USS Hornet at Alameda Point where even more creatures thrive in relative obscurity.

The area encompasses an interconnected web of vegetation, birds, seals, fish, mollusks, crustaceans and worms. Ghost shrimp, bat rays, leopard sharks, striped crabs, mussels, California sea hares and fish with light-emitting diodes are just a sampling. A 36-foot-wide rock wall, known as a breakwater and built by the Navy in 1945, forms the mile-long southern boundary.

Ghost shrimp at Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point. Red spots on shrimp are baby shrimp. Click on photo to enlarge.
Ghost shrimp at Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point. Red spots on shrimp are baby shrimp. Click on photo to enlarge.

Ghost shrimp are seldom seen, since they spend most of their lives in tunnels constantly digging and filtering the sandy mud for nutrients. But the evidence of their presence is plain to see during low tide at the mudflat west of the Encinal Boat Ramp. Thousands of small mud mounds dotting the landscape have an opening in the center leading down into the shrimp burrow.

Mudflat at Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point, during low tide showing shrimp burrows.
Mudflat at Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point, during low tide showing shrimp burrows.

The shrimps’ perpetual mining and aeration of the mud makes the environment attractive to other species as well, such as the arrow goby. These tiny fish are only a few inches long and almost completely transparent. They share the burrows with the shrimp. At low tide they can be seen darting around in shallow pools of water in the sand. Occasionally least terns dive to grab a goby.

Two arrow gobies at Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point. The gobies take shelter inside of ghost shrimp tunnels and also benefit from the shrimps' feeding activities that release food morsels the fish can eat.
Two arrow gobies at Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point. The gobies take shelter inside of ghost shrimp tunnels and also benefit from the shrimps’ feeding activities that release food morsels the fish can eat.

Lugworm at Breakwater Beach, Alameda PointA neighbor of the shrimp and gobies is the lugworm or sandworm. They, too, are seldom seen, but at low tide their ropey casings of excavated sand and mud are a clear sign of their presence. Another sign of their presence in recent weeks are the almost clear egg sacs. At low tide they look like deflated balloons that washed ashore. But when submersed in water, it becomes apparent that the egg sacs are tethered to the worms’ tunnels. The jelly sac keeps the eggs moist at low tide.

Lugworm egg sacs on Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point.
Lugworm egg sacs on Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point.

Another seldom seen creature is the foot-long California sea hare or sea slug. Their brownish color and slow movement makes them difficult to spot, even when they venture among the rocks near the water surface. During egg-laying season, a clue to their presence is the large bright yellow clumps of eggs deposited on the rocks, which look like angel hair pasta. 

CA sea hare, or sea slug, foraging for food on rocky shoreline next to Bay Trail.
CA sea hare, or sea slug, foraging for food on rocky shoreline next to Bay Trail.

Sea vegetation serves as an anchor for herring eggs. Some eggs are churned up by tides and currents during the prolific herring-spawning season and eaten by birds.

Gull with herring eggs attached to shafts of vegetation it retrieved from just below the water surface in Alameda Point harbor.
Gull with herring eggs attached to shafts of vegetation it retrieved from just below the water surface in Alameda Point harbor.

Algae and vegetation on rocks in the tidal zone serve as food for striped crabs, always busy picking away. But crabs will quickly move under a rock if they spot a visitor with one of their eyes that can be raised up out of the socket.

Striped crab on breakwater at Alameda Point.
Striped crab on breakwater at Alameda Point.

Armies of kelp flies walk – not fly – along the waterline on the beach during warm weather waiting for kelp to wash up so they can lay eggs.

Kelp flies on Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point.
Kelp flies on Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point.

Small fish, such as the jack smelt, provide food for the diving California least terns.  Just about any size fish is prey for the California brown pelicans that hang out by the thousands on the section of breakwater surrounded by water known as Breakwater Island.  Fellow marine birds the double-crested cormorants dive deep, chasing down prey by paddling their webbed feet.  Mussels are a delicacy for gulls, which can often be seen hovering and dropping mussels on rocks and pavement to crack open the shell.

Mussels and barnacles on the breakwater at Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point.
Mussels and barnacles on the breakwater at Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point.

The strangest fish to appear in the channel is the plainfin midshipman. It can create its own light in the deep waters it inhabits during most of the year. Their skin is laced with hundreds of bioluminescent photophores that can help it attract prey, as well as emitting light that matches surrounding water to make it difficult for predators to see.

Cormorant holding plainfin midshipman that it retrieved by diving in the Alameda Point Channel. Dotted lines on underbelly of fish are light-emitting photophores. These fish lay eggs among shoreline rocks and their young are capable of breathing air during low tide before maturing and swimming away. Due to lack of research, it is unknown whether plainfin midshipman lay eggs at Alameda Point. Other smaller and easier to swallow plainfin midshipman were caught by this cormorant.
Cormorant holding plainfin midshipman that it retrieved by diving in the Alameda Point Channel. Dotted lines on underbelly of fish are light-emitting photophores. These fish lay eggs among shoreline rocks and their young are capable of breathing air during low tide before maturing and swimming away. Due to lack of research, it is unknown whether plainfin midshipman lay eggs at Alameda Point. Other smaller and easier to swallow plainfin midshipman were caught by this cormorant.

The leopard shark with its large leopard-like brown markings can grow to seven feet in length but is harmless to humans. These fish forage for food in the shallow intertidal zone going after crabs, shrimp, worms, other fish and fish eggs.

Leopard shark next to breakwater at Alameda Point.
Leopard shark next to breakwater at Alameda Point.

A gracefully beautiful fish and a regular at Alameda Point is the bat ray, which feeds along the bottom but can occasionally be seen swimming just below the surface.

Bat ray near Bay Trail at Alameda Point.
Bat ray near Bay Trail at Alameda Point.

A moon jellyfish was recently spotted in Alameda Point waters, drifting along near the surface.

Moon jellyfish drifting at the gap in the breakwater at Alameda Point.
Moon jellyfish drifting at the gap in the breakwater at Alameda Point.

Harbor seals, representing marine mammals, round out the marine life roster. Alameda Point hosts the only harbor seal haul-out in the East Bay between Yerba Buena Island and Fremont.

Harbor seals at Alameda Point at sunrise.
Harbor seals at Alameda Point at sunrise.

Originally published in the Alameda Sun.

More photos of Alameda Point marine life, with map

Ghost shrimp with eggs at Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point.
Ghost shrimp with eggs at Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point.
Red objects on ghost shrimp are baby ghost shrimp, at Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point.
Red objects on ghost shrimp are baby ghost shrimp, at Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point.
CA sea hare, or sea slug, foraging along rocky shoreline next to Bay Trail at Alameda Point.
CA sea hare, or sea slug, foraging along rocky shoreline next to Bay Trail at Alameda Point.
CA sea hare (rear view) with yellow strands of eggs recently deposited on the breakwater.
CA sea hare (rear view) with yellow strands of eggs recently deposited on the breakwater.
Closeup showing individual CA sea hare eggs at Alameda Point.
Closeup showing individual CA sea hare eggs at Alameda Point.
School of anchovies at shoreline next to Bay Trail.
School of anchovies at shoreline next to Bay Trail.
Tube worm on Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point.
Tube worm on Breakwater Beach, Alameda Point.
Jack smelt caught by fisherman at Alameda Point breakwater to use as bait.
Jack smelt caught by fisherman at Alameda Point breakwater to use as bait.
Two striped crabs eating vegetation on the breakwater at Alameda Point.
Two striped crabs eating vegetation on the breakwater at Alameda Point.

Alameda Point waterway